Thématique

  • -Tout-
  • Multi-secteurs
  • Start-up et Numérique
  • Fonds d'Investissement et de Soutien aux Entreprises en Afrique
  • Industrie et services
  • Nos outils financiers
  • Accompagnement Technique
  • Education
  • Fonds d'Investissement
  • Infrastructures
  • ARE Scale Up
  • Climat et Energie
  • Santé
  • Banques et Marchés Financiers
  • Microfinance
  • Agriculture et Agro-Industrie
Thanks to the emergence of the financial technologies sector – fintech – and mobile phones in Africa, these devices have become real service delivery platforms. One example is JUMO, a start-up which opens access to credit and savings in real time via smartphones.
In Africa, 80% of people living on the continent are connected to a mobile phone network, but only 20% have a bank account. At the same time, the explosive growth of fintechs in emerging economies allows millions of people to overcome daily difficulties related to access to electricity, healthcare, education or to obtain venture capital or cash. Another even more important aspect is that fintechs provide an affordable range of financial services and practical uses for people who benefit little or not at all from banking services. They therefore pave the way for universal financial inclusion.

In this context, AFD Group considers fintechs as key partners in its efforts to reduce extreme poverty and promote shared prosperity in developing countries. In April 2018, PROPARCO, AFD’s private sector financing arm, made a USD 3m equity investment in JUMO, a start-up providing access to credit and savings in real time via a simple mobile phone. The company’s services are available in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Ghana and Pakistan.
Know more
AfricaSenegal
HARDLY-HIT BY THE OIL-PRICE HIKE IN 2008, CONSTRAINED BY AN INADEQUATE ENERGY SYSTEM, SENEGAL HAS BEGUN TO EXPLOIT ITS IMMENSE RENEWABLE ENERGY POTENTIAL, WITH SOLAR POWER IN THE LEAD. THE NUMBER OF PROJECTS HAS BEEN RISING FOR TWO YEARS NOW, A PRIME EXAMPLE BEING SENERGY, THE COUNTRY'S FIRST PRIVATE SOLAR POWER PLANT AND THE LARGEST ONE IN WEST AFRICA, 80% FINANCED BY PROPARCO. THE AIM IS TO HELP BOOST SENEGAL’S ENERGY SECURITY AND FACILITATE THE TRANSITION TO LOW-CARBON DEVELOPMENT.

As in several other African countries, Senegal’s economic and social development is held back by sub-par performance in the energy sector. With 843 MW of nameplate power capacity in 2015 (whereas Morocco’s is ten times higher), the national power grid is ill-equipped to handle the growing needs of businesses and citizens alike. There are many reasons for that deficiency, among them over a decade of under-investment in generation capacity and Senegal’s high dependency on fossil fuels, with thermal power plants accounting for 90% of total output. But things got even worse in the period from 2008 to 2011, when the global oil shock upended the country’s energy sector. The result was massive power cuts and a profound social crisis, as demonstrated by the ‘electricity riots’ of 2011. Moreover, Senegal’s electricity prices are among the highest in West Africa (almost twice as high as in the Ivory Coast), despite a 2009 freeze on rates and generous State subsidies to the national power company, Senelec, until 2014. According to an IMF estimate, those subsidies are equal to 2% of GDP.
Know more
Cambodia
By offering financial services to the neediest population groups, microfinance institutions support micro-enterprises and help enhance living conditions for their customers. Microfinance provides assistance in starting up a business, mobilizing savings or taking out insurance to cope with the hazards of life. This meants it has a potential for growth that is commensurate with the degree of financial exclusion that continues to plague so many developing countries. At first blush, this looks like a ideal way out of poverty.
Know more